stress fractures

Foot Stress Fractures

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You’re a weekend warrior. You work all week and when you have free time, you love to be outside, jogging, biking, and just being active. But all of a sudden, this repetitive activity stops you in your tracks and you experience:

  • Visible bruising on the foot
  • Swelling on the top of the foot
  • Pain while walking or standing
  • Tenderness to touch

 

What is a Stress Fracture

A stress fracture, also called a hairline fracture, occurs when overuse causes a thin crack to form in the bone. In some cases, severe bruising within the bone may develop without causing a crack. In either instance, this can be an extremely painful condition. Stress fractures most often occur in the second and third metatarsals of the foot, which are the long, thin bones between the innermost joints of the toes and the ankle.

Preventing a More Serious Injury

If you have sustained a stress fracture in your foot, it is extremely important that you get the right treatment right away. That degree of stress on the bone has already paved the way for a more serious injury such as a full fracture to occur. Never continue to put stress on any foot that you suspect may have a stress fracture. You should seek medical attention as quickly as possible and administer RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation).

Foot Stress Fracture Treatment

Whether you’re a weekend warrior, an athlete, or an older individual who may have diminished bone density, anyone is susceptible to hairline stress fractures in the foot. When this painful condition occurs, you need the expertise of an experienced foot doctor to evaluate and treat the injury. Physician Partners of America has an experienced team of professionals that specialize in stress fractures and other overuse foot injuries. After a thorough exam and X-rays, we should be able to diagnose the full extent of your injury. In some cases if a more serious injury is suspected, an MRI, CT scan, or nuclear bone scan be necessary. Most hairline fractures, with rest, conservative treatment, and supportive devices such as an air cast or crutches, heal on their own over a period of six to eight weeks.

At Physician Partners of America, we offer comprehensive foot care for stress fractures. Whether you need physical therapy or surgery for your foot injury, our care team’s first priority is getting you healed and back to enjoying a healthy, active life.  

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