PPOA http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com Mon, 22 May 2017 19:56:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cropped-PPOA-fav-32x32.jpg PPOA http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com 32 32 The Link Between Pain and Depression http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/link-pain-depression/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 20:51:01 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14469 Pain and depression are closely linked. Studies show that pain can cause depression and depression can cause pain. Since pain and depression are so closely related, it is important to understand how they work so you can get the treatment you need. The Ongoing Cycle of Pain and Depression One of the most frustrating elements […]

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Pain and depression are closely linked. Studies show that pain can cause depression and depression can cause pain. Since pain and depression are so closely related, it is important to understand how they work so you can get the treatment you need.

The Ongoing Cycle of Pain and Depression

One of the most frustrating elements for people going through pain or depression is the way that it can quickly lead to a back and forth pattern. It can be a difficult cycle at times, as the more depressed you are, the worse your pain may feel. Then the increased pain can cause you to feel more depressed.

People who have been diagnosed with depression often have an increased chance of developing chronic pain. Similarly, people who have chronic pain can also have a higher chance of developing depression.

What Kind of Pain Could Lead to Depression?

Almost any kind of pain could lead you to have feelings of depression. It could be pain from a recent injury or due to a condition like diabetes or heart disease.

Chronic pain is a major factor in potentially developing depression. Ongoing pain can increase a person’s chance of developing anxiety or depression over time, sometimes leading to clinical depression.

What Causes the Pain and Depression Link?

Researchers believe that the brain is the key to the connection between pain and depression. The structure of the brain is set up so there is some crossover between the areas of the brain where pain takes place and the parts that depression and other mood disorders occur.

Your brain function is another reason why pain and depression may be linked. Your brain uses neurotransmitters to signal pain in your body. Those neurotransmitters also help keep your mood steady using things like norepinephrine and serotonin.

Basically, the same elements that are used to help people with mood disorders can also help to relieve pain, due to the similarities in the brain. That is helpful for treatment, as improving one area can help with the other area as well.

How to Treat Pain and Depression

Whether you have pain, depression or both, there are plenty of treatment options to help you feel better and keep you from getting into the pain and depression cycle. Your doctor can help you figure out the best treatment option.

Possible treatments may include:

  • Psychological counseling- Talking to a professional can be helpful for relieving mood disorders and pain problems
  • Antidepressant medications-  Even though antidepressants are made to help with your depression, they may also help with pain
  • Wellness strategies- Having good overall health can help with your depression and pain, so healthy eating, getting exercise and sleeping well can help
  • Keep stress levels low- Do whatever you can to keep your stress low, like meditation

The cycle of pain and depression can be stopped with the right help. Talk to a medical professional about your symptoms, start treatment and get on the path to feeling good inside and out.

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The Facts About Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/facts-complex-regional-pain-syndrome-crps/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 20:47:34 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14468 Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a nervous system malfunction that you may not have heard of unless you or someone you know has been diagnosed with it. CRPS is a chronic condition where a person feels pain in one or more of their limbs after an injury. If you have recently had an injury […]

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Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a nervous system malfunction that you may not have heard of unless you or someone you know has been diagnosed with it. CRPS is a chronic condition where a person feels pain in one or more of their limbs after an injury.

If you have recently had an injury and find that you are having pain in one or more of your limbs, check to make sure it is not CRPS. After a CRPS diagnosis, you probably want to get as much information as you can about the condition. Here are the facts about CRPS:

CRPS Usually Affects the Arms or Legs After Injury or Incident

Your arms and legs are the typical areas that CRPS could impact. It most often occurs after an injury or incident like stroke, heart attack or surgical procedure.

You Should Begin Treatment as Early as You Can

If you are able to begin treatment as early as possible, it will increase your chances of effectively treating it into possible remission. Pay attention to your symptoms and do not ignore the signs of CRPS.

As soon as you recognize CRPS symptoms, get help right away. A specialist can help you manage the symptoms, relieve the pain and keep the condition from getting worse.

Symptoms of CRPS

The symptoms of CRPS may include:

  • Constant feeling of burning or throbbing in the affected limb, typically your leg, arm, foot or hand
  • Swelling in the affected limb
  • The limb may be sensitive to old temperatures or being touched
  • Your limb may change temperature from hot to cold and back
  • Your joints may swell or feel stiff
  • Your skin tone may change, turning mottled or shades of red or blue
  • You skin may also have texture changes, becoming thinner, more tender or shiny
  • The affected limb may have changes in nail and hair growth
  • You may experience muscle spasms or atrophy
  • Difficulty moving the affected limb

These symptoms can vary from one person to the next, but the sensitivity and pain may occur first. The important thing is to see a doctor as soon as you can.

Critical Information About CRPS

One of the reasons why it is so important to pay attention to the symptoms is because the changes in skin color may occur at a point when your condition has become irreversible. Again, prompt treatment is crucial.

It is possible for CRPS to go away on its own if the pain and symptoms are not too severe and do not get worse. However, CRPS could possibly spread from the affected limb to another part of your body, like the limb on the opposite side.

Keep in mind that CRPS pain could get worse if you are stressed out. So even if the condition has you feeling stressed, try to stay calm and simply get the help you need.

Your medical team can help you find the right treatment plan and get your CRPS symptoms under control before they get worse.   

 

 

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The Psychological Effects of Living with Pain http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/psychological-effects-living-pain/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 20:45:03 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14470 Millions of people in the United States have experienced chronic pain and it can have a major impact on your psyche. While you are dealing with chronic pain, it is also important to pay attention to your mental health to assure that you stay healthy in every way. Pain and your mood are closely related, […]

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Millions of people in the United States have experienced chronic pain and it can have a major impact on your psyche. While you are dealing with chronic pain, it is also important to pay attention to your mental health to assure that you stay healthy in every way.

Pain and your mood are closely related, which is why chronic pain can have a number of psychological effects, including:

Psychological Effects on Your Mood

It can be difficult to be in a good mood when you are going through chronic pain. When you are in pain, it can lead to feelings of depression or anxiety. Those feelings of depression can also lead to your pain getting worse, which can increase your depression all over again.

The psychological effects of chronic pain can cause bouts of anxiety or depression, but it can also lead to long-term clinical depression, which can really impact your quality of life.

Psychological Effects on Your Quality of Life

When you get into that sort of cycle from pain to depression and back, it can end up having an impact on your entire quality of life. It may be difficult to have a positive quality of life when you are facing an increased amount of pain and emotional distress.

Another way that chronic pain can impact your quality of life is by making it difficult for you to do your usual daily activities. When you are in constant pain, it could make it hard for you to go to work, spend time with friends and enjoy your life.

If chronic pain leaves you unable to work, it can make your anxiety or depression feel worse and make you feel stressed out about money. Your quality of life can suffer under these conditions, which is why it is important to get help.

Some of the other ways that chronic pain can impact your quality of life include:

  • Changes in mood including anger, fear, confusion and irritability
  • Anxiety and stress
  • Self-esteem issues
  • Decreased interest in sex
  • Changes in weight
  • Sleep issues and feelings of fatigue

If chronic pain is making you depressed or negatively impacting your way of life, take steps to get treatment as soon as you can.

Getting Help with the Psychological Effects of Living with Pain

Your mental health is very important for your overall well being and quality of life. Chronic pain can be debilitating in a number of ways, from the physical side of the pain to the draining emotional side of the pain.

If you or a family member are suffering through chronic pain and the psychological effects of it, professional help can make a major difference.

Pain management specialists can help you figure out a treatment plan that improves the physical and mental sides of chronic pain. A psychologist may be able to help you through it as well, as therapy can be beneficial for pain management.

With the link between pain and depression, your psychological wellness may need help if you are experiencing chronic pain. Talk to your pain management team and figure out a total wellness plan to feel better.  

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Should I See a Pain Management Specialist? http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/should-i-see-a-pain-management-specialist/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 14:04:04 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14479 Chronic pain is exactly what it sounds like. It is an ongoing period of discomfort that causes people to feel almost constant pain in some part of their bodies. For people who suffer through chronic pain, it can be difficult to lead a normal life. A pain management specialist can help with that. Before you […]

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Chronic pain is exactly what it sounds like. It is an ongoing period of discomfort that causes people to feel almost constant pain in some part of their bodies.

For people who suffer through chronic pain, it can be difficult to lead a normal life. A pain management specialist can help with that.

Before you decide whether or not to see a pain management specialist, here are some things to consider:

Start with Some Questions

Before you see a pain management specialist, ask yourself a few questions first. To begin, how long have you had this pain? If it’s a new pain, you may not need a pain management specialist right away. If it’s something that has been ongoing, you may.

Another thing to ask yourself is if you know what’s causing the pain and if any treatment has improved your discomfort. For example, if you’ve recently been injured and are currently having treatment, you may want to give that treatment time before exploring other options.

However, the big question you should ask yourself is if the pain you’re in is negatively impacting your daily life. If your current treatments aren’t working and your pain makes it difficult to lead a normal life, a pain management specialist may be able to help.

How a Pain Management Specialist can Help

Pain management specialists will work to diagnose it and determine what the causes may be. Since they focus specifically on pain, they know the latest medical treatments and techniques to help.

When it comes to treatment, pain management specialists can come up with a plan to treat your pain using multiple disciplines. This means seeking out other professionals in areas like psychology, rehabilitation and physical therapy.

Your pain management specialist can help to figure out a comprehensive plan to treat your pain, even when it comes to bringing others onboard.

What Happens When You Visit a Pain Management Specialist?

When you are ready to head to a pain management specialist, come prepared with information. Your specialist will need to know what tests you’ve had done, what medications you’ve taken and what procedures you’ve have done. They may have you fill out a questionnaire before you come in for a visit so they have the information they need.

If you’ve had any imaging done, like X-rays, CAT scans or MRI, be sure to bring copies of the images for your pain management specialist. All of this data will help to get you on the right path from your first visit.

Expect a physical and a question and answer session during your initial visit. If you need any tests done, your pain management specialist will let you know. Ideally, you should ask if any tests are expected when you are scheduling your first appointment so you can plan accordingly. Depending on the test, you might need to fast beforehand or have someone drive you home after.

Ongoing pain doesn’t have to be a mystery. Let a pain management specialist help you find answers and get your life back.  

 

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The Facts About Cluster Headaches http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/the-facts-about-cluster-headaches/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 14:02:37 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14480 Headaches are a common ailment, but they can be quite debilitating. A bad headache can make it hard to do your job, drive your kids around or simply get through your day. If one headache can cause such a disruption, a series of them can be even more difficult to deal with. If you get […]

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Headaches are a common ailment, but they can be quite debilitating. A bad headache can make it hard to do your job, drive your kids around or simply get through your day.

If one headache can cause such a disruption, a series of them can be even more difficult to deal with. If you get intense headaches that seem to come in a pattern, you may be dealing with cluster headaches.

What are Cluster Headaches?

Cluster headaches are recurring headaches that may come around each day on a weekly or even monthly basis. The pain of cluster headaches is often intense and may occur on one side of your head or near one of your eyes.

How Often do Cluster Headaches Occur?

The frequency of cluster headaches may vary. The clusters may hit for only a week or may continue for months. When the clusters pass, you may have months or possibly years of peace before they return.

Some people may experience cluster headaches on a seasonal basis, so it can be easy to mistake them for allergy-related headaches if you are unfamiliar with them.

While the cluster period is going on, the headaches tend to take place each day, sometimes more than once a day. The headaches frequently happen at the same time of the day, often at night when you are in bed.

What are the Symptoms of Cluster Headaches?

Here are some of the symptoms that may accompany cluster headaches:

  • Intense pain, typically located near one eye, though they could impact other parts of your head, face, shoulders or neck
  • Teary eyes
  • Droopy eyelid
  • Red eyes on the side of the headache
  • Swollen eyes on the side of the headache
  • Feeling restless
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Flushed or pale face
  • Some sweating

What Causes Cluster Headaches?

Though the exact cause of cluster headaches is unknown, the nerves near your eye are believed to be a factor. That is why the pain is sometimes located near your eyes.

Men may be more likely to get cluster headaches. Though they may occur at any age, people usually get them between 20 and 50 years old.

Can Cluster Headaches Switch Sides?

Yes, it is possible for headaches to switch from one side of your head to another, though they tend to take place on one side most of the time.

What Happens After the Cluster Headaches Pass?

The pain may pass as quickly as it began. Though the pain should go away, it may leave you feeling really tired. Cluster headaches can be an exhausting experience.

How are Cluster Headaches Treated?

Unless you plan on waiting until the cluster headaches pass, you should go to the doctor for treatment options. There are a number of possible treatments, from oxygen or local anesthetics to dihydroergotamine or triptans.

If you frequently suffer through cluster headaches, your doctor can also help you with preventative treatment option to help keep the cluster headaches at bay.

Surgery is sometimes an option in extreme situations if other treatments are not working, though this is rare.

 

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What are Hemicrania Continua Headaches? http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/what-are-hemicrania-continua-headaches/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 13:56:09 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14481 Hemicrania continua headaches are a headache that causes constant pain on one side of your head or your face. It is a rare condition, but for people who suffer from it, the constant pain can be really debilitating. Though the exact cause of hemicrania continua headaches is not known, there are treatment options available. Luckily, […]

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Hemicrania continua headaches are a headache that causes constant pain on one side of your head or your face. It is a rare condition, but for people who suffer from it, the constant pain can be really debilitating.

Though the exact cause of hemicrania continua headaches is not known, there are treatment options available. Luckily, with treatment, the pain and discomfort of hemicrania continua headaches can often be relieved.

Symptoms of Hemicrania Continua Headaches

If you have a headache that causes uninterrupted pain on one side, you may have hemicrania continua headaches. Hemicrania continua headaches have specific symptoms that may include:

  • A constant dull pain of one side of your head
  • The dull pain changes to a sharp, jolting or stabbing pain several times a day
  • Teary, red or irritated eyes
  • Runny nose or stuffy nose
  • Droopy eyelids
  • Sweaty forehead

Other possible symptoms of hemicrania continua headaches are similar to the symptoms that people experience with migraines, such feeling sensitive to light or sound. You may get nauseous or vomit due to the headaches.

For some people, the symptoms may occur as they rotate or put pressure on their necks. There are also factors that may make your hemicrania continua headache symptoms increase, such as:

  • Feeling stress or fatigue
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Bright light
  • Sleep changes
  • Overexerting yourself during exercise

Women tend to experience hemicrania continua headaches more often than men. Usually the symptoms begin in adulthood, though they could begin in childhood as well.

Living with Hemicrania Continua Headaches

Being in constant pain can be a real burden. When experiencing relentless pain, you may have a hard time doing everyday activities like going to work or taking care of your family. Things like driving or using a computer can be difficult if you are experiencing sensitivity to light that makes your headache feel worse.   

Since the headaches tend to get sharp and more intense multiple times a day, the pain can be a real intrusion on your day. Treatment can help you feel better and get back to your daily routine without the constant discomfort of hemicrania continua headaches.

How to Treat Hemicrania Continua Headaches

If you have experienced a headache that causes you constant pain for several months, head to a doctor to see if you may have hemicrania continua. Keep in mind that the pain of hemicrania continua headaches stays on one side of your head without switching.

If you are diagnosed with hemicrania continua headaches, treatment can help relieve your symptoms so you can find relief.  Indomethacin is a treatment option that can offer quick relief from the headache pain. This medication can sometimes cause stomach discomfort, so talk to your doctor to see if you may need additional medicine to help with any stomach issues.

There are other medication that may help with hemicrania continua headaches, like celecoxib or even antidepressant medications.
If your headaches do not improve after taking indomethacin, your doctor may do an MRI to see if your headaches are caused by another condition.

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The Hidden Costs of Dealing with Pain http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/the-hidden-costs-of-dealing-with-pain/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 13:55:22 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14476 Pain management impacts millions of Americans each year and costs the national economy billions of dollars. This is because chronic pain costs more than just the cost of medical care. The hidden costs of chronic pain can impact the economy of the entire country because it has such massive impacts on individuals. If you or […]

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Pain management impacts millions of Americans each year and costs the national economy billions of dollars. This is because chronic pain costs more than just the cost of medical care.

The hidden costs of chronic pain can impact the economy of the entire country because it has such massive impacts on individuals. If you or someone in your family is going through ongoing pain, here are some of the hidden costs that you may experience:

Difficulty Working

For someone going through chronic pain problems, working can be very difficult, no matter what you do for a living. If you work in job where you have to sit most of the day, you could aggravate your pain. If you work a very physical job, that could also make pain more intense.

Depending on the source of your pain, it could be difficult to concentrate at work and perform your best. Headaches, for example, can be very hard to ignore when you are trying to work.

These difficulties can lead to serious costs. If your pain causes you to need to miss work and take sick days, that can cost both you and your company money. If the pain continues to get negatively impact your work, you run the risk of losing your job, which can lead to a number of monetary issues.

Potential Disability

Pain problems are the leading cause of disability for American adults, according to the American Chronic Pain Association. When pain reaches the point of becoming a disability, there can be a number of potential costs that come along, both for the individual and society.

If a pain-related disability leaves you unable to work, costs can quickly begin to add up. Not only will you need to pay for your medical expenses, but all of the other areas of your life as well. Even if you are able to collect disability, you are likely to have to keep costs down to make it all work out.

Trouble Enjoying Activities

Though the financial costs of chronic pain can be numerous, perhaps the most debilitating cost of all is the personal cost. When you are constantly in pain, it can make it difficult to enjoy your family, friends and hobbies.

There is no dollar amount that can make up for missing memories because you are in pain. You deserve to enjoy your life without the constant struggle of pain holding you back.

Invest in the Right Medical Treatment

With all of the costs that chronic pain can bring about, it can be overwhelming. However, your focus should be on getting better. Though there are costs associated with chronic pain treatment, getting help now can help lessen the expenses you will pay down the road.

Putting off medical treatment is not a good idea. Consider the costs of medical care as an investment in your future. You want to get your pain under control so it does not impact your ability to earn income or enjoy your life.
If you wait to get help, the pain may get worse. Treatment now can actually save you money later.

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What is Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension? http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/what-is-idiopathic-intracranial-hypotension/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 13:55:12 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14478 Idiopathic intracranial hypotension, sometimes known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a condition that causes pressure inside a person’s head even though there is no brain tumor or other discernible reason for the pressure. Though idiopathic intracranial hypotension is a rare condition, with fewer than 200,000 diagnoses in the U.S. each year, the people who do have […]

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Idiopathic intracranial hypotension, sometimes known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a condition that causes pressure inside a person’s head even though there is no brain tumor or other discernible reason for the pressure.

Though idiopathic intracranial hypotension is a rare condition, with fewer than 200,000 diagnoses in the U.S. each year, the people who do have it experience symptoms similar to a brain tumor, which can make life more difficult.

For example, idiopathic intracranial hypotension could cause painful headaches or problems with vision, including temporary blindness. These symptoms can cause a disruption in your life, making it difficult to drive, work or enjoy your usual activities.

The word “idiopathic” indicated that the cause of intracranial hypotension is not known. However, there are treatments that can help.

Symptoms of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension

As mentioned, idiopathic intracranial hypotension has symptoms that are similar to those you see in someone with a brain tumor. Pressure inside a person’s head increases with idiopathic intracranial hypotension. However, there is no tumor in place to cause these symptoms.

The symptoms may include blurry vision or double vision. Some people may experience temporary loss of sight. There may be periods of dizziness, nausea or episodes of vomiting.

You may also experience hearing a ringing in the ears, sometimes corresponding to your heartbeat. Some people may have a hard time concentrating or a stiff feeling in the neck.

Headaches are one of the most common symptoms in people with intracranial hypotension. The headache is usually behind the eyes. These headaches may be severe, especially when standing upright and are often are not as bad when the person is lying down.

Some people describe the pain as throbbing, others do not. The pressure can feel like a weight pressing down on the head or a feeling like something is pulling from the skull down through your neck.

Idiopathic intracranial hypotension is most commonly found in obese women, particularly those who are old enough to have children. Weight loss may help to relieve the symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypotension.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension

If you experience the symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypotension, go to the doctor and talk through your symptoms. You will likely get lab tests done and possibly imaging to confirm that there is no tumor present in your brain and the condition is in fact idiopathic intracranial hypotension.

Once you have been diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypotension, your doctor will determine the best potential course of treatment. Medication is usually the preferred treatment, when possible.

Diuretics, medicine that makes you produce more urine to get rid of excess water and salt in your body, are typically the first option for treating idiopathic intracranial hypotension. Furosemide and acetazolamide are among the diuretics that you may be prescribed. The medicine helps you produce less spinal fluid and relieve your symptoms.

If medication does not help, you may need a surgical procedure to help relieve the pressure in your skull. Talk to your doctor to see if surgery is needed.

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The Facts About Lower Back Pain http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/the-facts-about-lower-back-pain/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 13:53:06 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14477 Lower back pain is something that impacts millions of people each year. The University of Maryland Medical Center estimates that 60 to 80% of American adults experience lower back pain. Back pain is the top cause of disability for Americans who are 45 years old and younger. It sends millions of people to the doctor […]

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Lower back pain is something that impacts millions of people each year. The University of Maryland Medical Center estimates that 60 to 80% of American adults experience lower back pain.

Back pain is the top cause of disability for Americans who are 45 years old and younger. It sends millions of people to the doctor each year and some of them end up with permanent damage.

With so many people going through lower back pain, it is important to understand some facts about the subject. Here are some things you should know:

Lower Back Pain Symptoms May Vary

Not all lower back pain has the same signs and symptoms. Some of the most common symptoms of lower back problems include:

  • Lower back stiffness
  • A tender feeling in the lower back
  • Pain that moves to the legs or buttocks
  • Difficulty getting up or standing still for extended periods of time
  • Inability to get in a comfortable position while sitting
  • Pain or weakness in the lower back or legs while walking

Causes of Lower Back Pain Aren’t Always Obvious

Sometimes lower back pain is the result of something specific, like a car accident or an injury. However, there are also times when it can be difficult to determine the exact cause of your lower back pain.

It can sometimes get injured without you realizing it, a twist or strain that you may not notice right away. Other times it could be due to a disk injury, like a bulging disk or a ruptured disk. Lower back pain can be caused by arthritis or osteoporosis.

Tense muscles can be a factor of lower back pain. Kidney stones may cause lower back pain. For women, endometriosis or pregnancy could cause lower back pain. At times, lower back pain could even be a symptom of something more serious, like a tumor or an infection.

There are so many potential causes of lower back pain. This is why consulting a doctor when you have lower back pain can help you determine the exact cause and best treatment.

There are Certain Risk Factors for Lower Back Pain

Though lower back pain could happen to anyone, there are some people who may be more likely than others to have lower back pain. For example, women may be more likely than men to have lower back issues

Some risk factors for lower back pain include:

  • Older age
  • A family history of back pain,
  • Being a smoker
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Anxiety or depression
  • A physical job or lifestyle
  • A job or lifestyle that is sedentary

There are Plenty of Lower Back Pain Treatment Options

With so many potential causes of lower back pain, the right treatment can vary. Sometimes lower back pain can get better by simply improving your overall health. Strengthening your back with exercise and eating healthy may make your back pain improve. Sitting in a chair with proper back support can also help.

When the cause of your lower back pain is something more serious, it may require more in-depth treatment. This might include medication, physical therapy or even surgery.

Talk to a medical professional to figure out what the right treatment is for you.

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Possible Causes of Upper Abdominal Pain http://www.physicianpartnersofamerica.com/health-news/pain-management/possible-causes-of-upper-abdominal-pain/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 12:44:58 +0000 http://physicianpartnersofamerica.com/?p=14472 When you are experiencing upper abdominal pain, it can definitely be frustrating to deal with. Part of that frustration is that you may not know right away what is causing the pain, which makes it more difficult to treat the pain and make it go away. A medical professional can diagnose and treat your upper […]

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When you are experiencing upper abdominal pain, it can definitely be frustrating to deal with. Part of that frustration is that you may not know right away what is causing the pain, which makes it more difficult to treat the pain and make it go away.

A medical professional can diagnose and treat your upper abdominal pain, but here are some of the possible causes:

Temporary Problems

Not all of the potential causes of upper abdominal pain are serious issue. Sometimes you might be dealing with something as simple as indigestion or gas. The pain in your upper abdomen could even be due to something like a pulled muscle or similar strain.

Keep an eye on when your symptoms begin, where in your upper abdomen they are located and the specific sort of pain that you are experiencing. If it is a temporary issue like one of the ones listed above, you likely will be able to get better without much difficulty. Your medical professional can offer advice and medicine as needed if the pain continues.

Stomach or Esophagus Problems

Your upper abdominal pain could be caused by an issue in your stomach or esophagus. These issues could include:

  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis
  • Heartburn
  • Hiatal hernia
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

Some things to keep in mind before you talk to your medical professional are whether or not certain foods make your pain feel worse or if the pain is more intense when you are laying down.

Gallbladder or Liver Problems

Pain in your upper abdomen could also be attributed to an issue in your gallbladder or liver. These problems could include:

  • Liver abscess
  • Gallstones
  • Hepatitis
  • Ascending cholangitis

Again, it will be easier for your doctor to figure out the exact source of the pain if you provide the necessary information. Some issues could be caused by lifestyle, like cirrhosis of the liver due to prolonged alcohol use.

Other Upper Abdominal Problems

There are also a number of intestinal issues that could be the cause of your upper abdominal pain. It could be due to an infection or an inflammatory situation. Or it could be due to a problem like:

  • Pancreatitis
  • Diverticulitis
  • Celiac disease
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Kidney stones

There are also some serious diseases that have the potential to cause upper abdominal pain, like certain cancers. This is why you should always get medical help to make sure you find out the exact cause of your pain and the appropriate treatment.

Treating Your Upper Abdominal Pain

No matter what the cause, it is important to consult with a medical professional to get your official diagnosis and treatment plan. If your symptoms come on suddenly and are severe, you should get to the doctor right away. Those symptoms could include vomiting blood, inability to have bowel movements, difficulty breathing, bloody stools, a rigid abdomen or any other severe pain.
Pay attention to your body and talk to your doctor about the specifics of your upper abdominal pain. You will get a treatment plan that works and peace of mind.

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